Solar Geometry

A Case for Divine Design of the Solar System

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The Solar Geometries

The distances of each planet from the Sun can be described by a unique geometric representation, or Solar Geometry, for each pair of planets, as shown below.

Note: x indicates the square root of x.
Click on any diagram below for a more detailed explanation.

Mercury and its Aphelion / Perihelion

Mercury = 1

Perihelion = 2- (2+1) = 0.792893
Aphelion = (2+1) = 1.207107

Start with a circle for Mercury's mean orbital distance, and then construct a square with sides of the same length.  The midpoint between the radius of the circle and the diagonal of the square is Mercury's aphelion (A), the outside point of its orbit.  The same distance towards the Sun is Mercury's perihelion (P), the inside point of its orbit.

Mercury - Venus

Venus = Mercury * ( ( 3 + 1 )) = 1.866025

Venus = 1.000000 *1.866025 =  1.866025

Start with a circle for Mercury's mean orbital distance, divide the circle into six equal sections, draw a line to form the equilateral triangle of one section and then draw a square using lines of the same length to get the orbital distance of Venus.

Venus - Earth

Earth = Venus * ( 5 + 1 ) = 2.583306

Earth = 1.596571 * 1.618034 = 2.583306

Start with the power of the orbital distance of Venus, and then construct the well known "golden section" or "Divine Proportion" to get to the mean orbital distance of Earth.

Earth - Mars

Mars = Earth * ( 6 + 2 ) = 3.936458

Mars = 2.037661 * 1.931852 = 3.936458

Note:  ( 6 + 2 ) = 2 * Cosine 15 = 1.931852
Also:  (2 * Venus) = (Diameter of Venus) =1.931852

Start with a circle using the power of the orbital distance of Earth as its radius, divide the circle into twelve equal sections, draw a line to form the isosceles triangle of the section and then draw another isosceles triangle on the other side using lines of the same length, forming a diamond, to get the orbital distance of Mars.

Mars - Jupiter

Jupiter = Mars * ( 2 + 2 ) = 13.439908

Jupiter = 3.936458 * 3.414214 = 13.439908

Start with the orbital distance of Mars, add a square made with the orbital distance of Mars turned on a diagonal and then add the orbital distance of Mars again to get the orbital distance of Jupiter.


The geometries that result are beautiful and elegant, yet simple.  Did these intriguing patterns happen by coincidence . . . or by design?  Before you decide, take a look at how Earth is related to the other planets.

 

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Brace yourself like a man; I will question you, and you shall answer me.  "Where were you when I laid the earth's foundation? Tell me, if you understand.  Who marked off its dimensions? Surely you know! Who stretched a measuring line across it?  On what were its footings set, or who laid its cornerstone--while the morning stars sang together and all the angels shouted for joy?  (Job 38:3-7)
 
 
All content and concepts copyright 1999 by Alan Bennett
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